Landscape: Sexy Lines

Sexy Sandstone CrackSometimes I think that furniture is sexy—especially the design kind you see on display at most museums of modern art—or architecture, or even a certain style of automobile (usually of the vintage Volkswagen variety). I’ve been laughed at for making comments such as: “That’s a sexy chair,” or “Check out that chrome bumper,” but seriously, folks, sexy lines abound. Here in the Utah desert, they’re everywhere you turn.

A sexy line can often be found in the natural world when there’s a certain slant of light (thank you, Emily Dickinson), or when two different colors meet each other abruptly, or when a line, as seen from above, seems to meander sexily through its surroundings. If you’ve never looked at something in nature and thought, “Humph. That’s sexy,” I’ve picked out a few examples (below) for you from Monday’s climbing venture to Indian Creek’s Finn wall—just so that we can all be on the same page about our use of the word “sexy” to describe a landscape feature.

Sexy line produced by a certain slant of light:

Sexy Sandstone Shadow

Sexy line produced in sky after jet fly-by:

Sexy Skyline

Sexy lines of road and dryish creek bed, as seen from above:

Sexy Dirt Road?!

As this site is devoted mostly to things natural, I won’t go off into a discussion of sexy appliances or other instances of good industrial design (instead, perhaps, reference Philippe Starck’s work at www.philippe-starck.com for ideas)—but I do encourage using the adjective “sexy” to describe inanimate objects, if used reverently. I happen to be sitting in a very sexy chair at Moab’s gorgeous/new/designtastic public library, and even though I would rather be outside, it’s nice to rest my bum here on such aesthetically pleasing upholstery while the weather is keeping me indoors.

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2 responses to “Landscape: Sexy Lines

  1. Philippe IS tres sexy (because everything and everyone French is sexy)…the creator of my sexy gnomes, my sexy Dr. No chairs, and my very sexy lemon juicer. Bravo for the reference and reverence.

  2. Pingback: Landscape: NYC's Greenspace « DOWN and OUT

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